Batten Institute

Cases & Multimedia

The Batten Institute translates research in the areas of innovation and entrepreneurship into teaching cases and multimedia educational materials. The cases, developed by Darden faculty and Batten Fellows, present the experiences of individuals and organizations that have grappled with complex business issues. Educators have found these materials to be invaluable resources for engaging students and for generating thought-provoking discussions. Darden Business Publishing offers the cases described below to all for purchase and the teaching notes described below to faculty members for purchase.

All     Research Paper Series     Books & Journals     Cases & Multimedia

 

Page 1

Title: "Ought" to "Can": Questions for an Entrepreneurial Future  

Type: Technical Note
Authors: S. Venkataraman and Saras D. Sarasvathy 
Date: May 2010
Format: Cases and Multimedia 

 This technical note explores the broadening role of entrepreneurship as both an economic and societal force. Students learn that as a distinct problem-solving method, entrepreneurship is teachable and applicable to a wide variety of issues central to human well-being and social improvement. It is akin to the scientific method in its capability to generate both the means to achieve yesterday's ends and the reasons to reject them in favor of new ends undreamed of previously. In this sense, it pervades and intervenes in every sphere of human hope  from economics and social welfare to the very definition of who we are and what we want for ourselves and the societies we live in.  

  

Title: Kelly Solar   

Type: Case Study
Authors: Samuel E. Bodily
Date: May 2010
Format: Cases and Multimedia 

A small start-up company must make additional investments to maximize its firm value. But the company owner will not make this investment unless she can renegotiate outstanding debt claims. Solving this "debt overhang" problem through negotiation is the focus of the case. In this context, students are exposed to a variety of issues: the nature of financial claims, bargaining and negotiation fundamentals, and agency costs of debt.  

  

Title: Appalachian Commercial Cleaners: Family Dynamics Versus the Business  

Type: Working Paper 
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: April 2010 
Format: Cases and Multimedia

This case is appropriate for students interested in becoming entrepreneurs, growing small businesses and the decision making required. The case presents the conflict between what is in the best interests of the business and the pressure caused by family dynamics. A successful family business has as its chief operating officer a son-in-law who is an outstanding performer. When the daughter of the CEO files for divorce, the wife of the founder and mother of the daughter demands that the son-in-law be fired.  

  

Title:  Aetna Inc.: Managing Inherent Enterprise Risks Through Stakeholder Management (A

Type: Case Study
Authors: Barie Carmichael and James Rubin 
Date: December 2009  
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Inherent risks or negatives are a critical element of "enterprise risk management" that must be mitigated or dramatically managed through constructive actions to sustain growth and manage reputation. Set in 2003 as Aetna prepares to settle a landmark class-action lawsuit, this case explores how communications and PR executives work with management to devise an announcement that fully engages the company's key stakeholders in this dramatic break with its industry's position. This case is well suited to courses and modules on crisis management, risk management, corporate communication, and strategic communication. Though written for a business school audience, it would be equally useful for courses in communication or public relations programs. The case asks students to choose from a number of possible communication strategies. It also asks students to relate communication strategy to the company's changing business model, which is demonstrated in detail in the case. The authors interviewed not only the top communication managers at Aetna, but also the CEO, CMO, and corporate counsel and some prominent legal experts. It is even more relevant as the world of crisis issues management, crisis management, and corporate litigation becomes ever more difficult to navigate.

 Link for more information 

  

Title: LG Investments, LLC: A Family Business in Generational 

Type: Case 
Authors: Hess, Edward 
Date: November 2009 
Format: Cases and Multimedia 
  
This technical note explores the broadening role of entrepreneurship as both an economic and societal force. Students learn that as a distinct problem-solving method, entrepreneurship is teachable and applicable to a wide variety of issues central to human well-being and social improvement. It is akin to the scientific method in its capability to generate both the means to achieve yesterday's ends and the reasons to reject them in favor of new ends undreamed of previously. In this sense, it pervades and intervenes in every sphere of human hope - from economics and social welfare to the very definition of who we are and what we want for ourselves and the societies we live in.  

Title: United States Patent and Trademark Office: Closing the Gap on Pendency in Class 705 Business Methods  

Type: Technical Note 
Authors: Chao, Raul 
Date: 5/20/2009  
Subject Area: Operations Management  
Format: Cases and Multimedia  

The United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) experiences overwelming demand for patents in Class 705: Business Methods. The current resources and process design are not sufficient to handle the incoming patents, and the result is extremely long wait times for patents to be granted. This technical note describes the history of the USPTO, the Business Methods Class, and the process for granting patents.  

  

Title: United Beverages: Product Development Genius or One-Hit-Wonder?  

Type: Case  
Authors: Chao, Raul 
Date: 5/14/2009 
Subject Area: Operations Management  
Format: Cases and Multimedia  

 United Beverages' first product, GangBusters Interactive Beverages, has reached the stage of wide brand recognition. However, over the past 12 months, growth has stalled and the product development team at United Beverages is considering several ideas for future growth. The team must consider market and technical uncertainty as well as resource allocation issues as they define the new product-development strategy for United Beverages.

  

Title: The Dime that Started a Movement: The History and Development of Credit Unions  

Type: Technical Note  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 5/4/2009   
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia  

This note provides students a rich background on the history, evolution, and current challenges in the credit union industry, with a particular focus on community-development credit unions. The case mentions key exemplar community-development credit unions and makes limited predictions about the industry's future direction. The case can be used a companion to "Credit Where Credit is Due: The Latino Community Credit Union" (UVA-ENT-0104).

  

Title: Lawrence Berger and Allied Screens, Inc.  

Type: Case   
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory 
Date: 5/4/2009   
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 

Having acquired Allied Screens two years earlier, Lawrence Berger is now facing a set of challenges: First, he has lost his largest customer; second, recent sales initiatives were showing mixed results; third, he is facing increasing pressure from his lender. On top of all these challenges, he wonders whether it is time to purse alternative career options. The case requires students to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze and develop alternatives for Berger, given his personal objectives and strategic challenges.  

  

Title: Finding Its Niche: Community Development Venture Capital  

Type: Technical Note  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory 
Date: 4/23/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation 
Format: Cases and Multimedia 
  
Underserved urban and rural areas have found venture capital support via U.S. Community Development Venture Capital institutions, which numbered 68 and managed $870 million as of 2008. Suitable for MBA, undergraduate, and executive learners studying venture capital, urban development, and private equity, this standalone backgrounder is also an excellent companion to cases about specific venture capital organizations. CDVCs face challenges unique in the field of private equity, including where they operate and how much lower their rates of return and compensation are. 

  

Title: Ascend Ventures into Education

Type: Case
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 4/23/2009   
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 

This case describes the decision by Ascend Ventures to invest in a firm that falls outside their investment strategy. Ascend Ventures is a relatively young private equity firm that has targeted technology companies that are managed by women or minorities. The company under their consideration, Platform Learning, operates in the for-profit education market, providing supplemental education services to children in failing public schools. Because Platform Learning is not a technology company, Ascend's investment managers are worried about their ability to add value in this market and concerned about how their limited partners might react to this investment.  

  

Title: Filling a Hole: The Reinvestment Fund and Progress Plaza  

Type: Case  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 4/20/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation

In underserved urban areas, commercial real estate development finance must often factor in government and local policy, community politics, environmental revitalization, ethnic markets, and mixed-use commercial development. In this case, the Reinvestment Fund and the Pennsylvania Fresh Food Financing Initiative join forces to provide access to quality groceries, something often lacking in urban areas. But redeveloping the Progress Plaza location where the new supermarket would be located did not come without headaches.

  

Title: Saunders Karp: Striking the Proper Balance  

Type: Case 
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory   
Date: 4/20/2009 
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation   


This case involves the decision-making process of Saunders Karp, a private equity firm, to invest in Dollar Tree, a single price-point discount store chain. The case requires students to perform a cursory valuation analysis, negotiate with counterparts from the Dollar Tree team, and make an investment recommendation.

  

Title: Dollar Tree Stores: Choosing a Financial Partner 

Type: Case  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory    
Date: 4/8/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia   


This case involves the decision-making process of single price discount store Dollar Tree in considering taking on Saunders Karp, a private equity firm, as an investor and partner. The case requires students to perform a cursory valuation analysis, negotiate with counterparts from the Saunders Karp team, and make recommendation.

  

Title: Breaking Down Barriers, Rebuilding Walls: The Role of Community Development Loan Funds  

Type: Technical Note 
Authors: Chao, Raul 
Date: 4/7/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


Community Development Loan Funds (CDLFs) make up the largest sector of the community development finance industry, with more than 800 certified CDLFs. Ninety-eight percent of CDLFs are nonprofit, servicing mainly the small business sector, with the help of the CDFI Fund, the Small Business Administration, and, increasingly, mainstream banks. CDLFs venture into risky areas where others sometimes fear to go, yet they have high repayment figures and low loss rates.

  

Title: Credit Where Credit is Due: The Latino Community Credit Union  

Type: Case  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 3/10/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


Five years after its launch, the Latino Community Credit Union had made remarkable progress, garnering 40,000 members and $22 million in assets. More extraordinary was the LCCU's customer base: Hispanic immigrants, many of them undocumented. The credit union's next bold step was to consider introducing credit cards for their customers. The question was how to make it work.

  

Title: Urban Brands and TSG Capital Group, LLC  

Type: Case  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 3/6/2009  
Subject Area: Strategy  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


This case is designed to illustrate the methods private-equity investors use in assessing the value of market opportunities in this instance, a plus-size clothing retailer targeted to African-American and Hispanic women. The case addresses several issues, including niche marketing, urban development, and the challenge of evaluating market potential. The protagonist, a private-equity partner, must determine the market viability of an investment opportunity offered to his firm.

  

Title: Ascend Ventures into Education  

Type: Case  
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 1/20/2009  
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


This case describes the decision by Ascend Ventures to invest in a firm that falls outside its investment strategy. Ascend Ventures is a relatively young private equity firm that has targeted technology companies that are managed by women or minorities.

    

Title: Six Degrees of Separation (Simulation)   

Type: Simulation
Authors: Fairchild, Gregory  
Date: 1/20/2009  
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


These materials can be used by instructors desiring to illustrate the role of social relationships in fostering organizational and entrepreneurial action. Based on Stanley Milgram's study of social connections in the 1960s, the exercise requires students to attempt to reach a target person through a chain of their own personal relationships. These connections are tracked through an online interface, and participants are able to track the progress of their relationship chains, along with demographic information about those who have participated in the exercise. For instructors, the exercise includes an online interface that tracks all participating chains, and allows the progress of each chain to be shown graphically on a global map. 

Page 2

Title:  Jennifer Parks at PillarPoint Home Loans: Developing a New-Growth Initiative 

Type: Case
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 1/20/2009
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 Jennifer Parks, a newly appointed business development officer at PillarPoint Home Loans, is given a mandate to identify and develop a new-growth initiative for her company. She works for a small mortgage division of one of the largest credit-card issuers in the United States, with more than 60 million accounts worldwide and a reputation as a leader in direct marketing and online services. New to the mortgage business, Parks studies the mortgage industry and identifies what she believes is a high-potential growth opportunity: a home-mortgage product aimed at high-net-worth customers of the parent company. As she's getting ready to present her idea to PillarPoint's executives, what should she propose as the next steps for moving the initiative forward?  

  

Title:  Preserve the Core and Stimulate Progress 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 12/31/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 10 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces the "Preserve the Core and Stimulate Progress," the last of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. Enduring great organizations, Collins has found, understand the difference between their core values, which remain constant, and their operating strategies and cultural practices, which continuously adapt to a changing world. Like the other programs in this series, "Preserve the Core" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  Clock Building, Not Time Telling 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 12/31/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In nine video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "Clock Building, Not Time Telling," the seventh of eight principles of greatness he introduced in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... And Others Don't. Great leaders, Collins explains, build catalytic mechanisms to ensure their organizations will prosper through multiple generations of leadership and product life cycles. Like the other programs in this series, "Clock Building, Not Time Telling" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  The Flywheel 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 12/31/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia

In eight video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "The Flywhee,l" the sixth of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... And Others Don't. In building greatness, Collins explains, there is no single lucky break or miracle moment; rather, the process resembles pushing a giant, heavy flywheel in one direction, turn upon turn, building momentum until a point of breakthrough. Like the other programs in this series, "The Flywheel" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  Culture of Discipline 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 12/11/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 12 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "The Culture of Discipline," the fifth of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. According to Collins, the cornerstone of a great corporate culture consists of disciplined people who engage in disciplined thought, and who take disciplined action-operating freely within a framework of responsibilities. Like the other programs in this series, "The Culture of Discipline" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  The Hedgehog Concept

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 11/25/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 12 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "The Hedgehog Concept," the fourth of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. A "hedgehog," Collins explains, is a single, lucid idea that flows from a deep understanding of three intersecting circles: what an individual is deeply passionate about, what that individual can be the best in the world at, and what drives that individual's economic engine. Like the other programs in this series, "The Hedgehog Concept" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  Confront the Brutal Facts 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 9/29/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 12 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "Confront the Brutal Facts-the Stockdale Paradox," the third of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. Great leaders, says Collins, retain unwavering faith that they will prevail in the end, regardless of the difficulties, and, at the same time, have the discipline to confront the most brutal facts of their current reality. The CD-ROM is intended as an introduction to one of the principles of greatness developed by Collins. Like the other programs in this series, "Confront the Brutal Facts" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  First Who ... Then What 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 9/24/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia

In 12 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "First Who ... Then What?" the second of the eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... and Others Don't. Collins explains that leaders who embrace "First Who ... Then What?" build enduring organizations by making it a priority to find the right people for key positions before determining their organization's direction. Like the other programs in this series, "First Who ... Then What?" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.  

  

Title:  Level 5 Leadership

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 9/20/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia

In 13 video segments, author Jim Collins introduces "Level 5 Leadership," the first of eight principles of greatness he identified in the international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... And Others Don't. Collins places "Level 5 Leadership" at the top of his theoretical hierarchy of executive capabilities. Level 5 leaders embody a paradoxical blend of personal humility and professional will to do whatever must be done to build enduring, great organizations. Like the other programs in this series, "Level 5 Leadership" can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. Our "Good to Great Experience" interactive teaching tools challenge intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school.

  

Title:  The Good-to-Great Experience 

Type: Simulation
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 9/19/2008
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia

"The Good to Great Experience" is a comprehensive faculty-edition multimedia teaching tool in which Jim Collins explores the eight principles of greatness identified in his international best seller Good to Great: Why Some Companies Make the Leap ... And Others Don't. In 54 video segments, Collins explains those principles, which he identified over a five-year exploration of 11 companies that made successful transitions from good results to sustained great results. Collins offers his insights on eight universal principles of greatness: "Level 5 Leadership"; "First Who ... Then What"; "Confront the Brutal Facts; The Hedgehog Concept"; "Culture of Discipline"; "The Flywheel"; "Clock-Building, Not Time-Telling"; and "Preserve the Core and Stimulate Progress." This interactive program can be used in courses in management, organizational behavior, strategy, and entrepreneurship and is appropriate for BBA, MBA, and executive audiences. While the program challenges intuitive assumptions about leadership, discipline, change, motivation, action, and the essence of greatness, "The Good-to-Great Experience" truly is the next best thing to having Collins himself in your classroom. NOTE: This product is available to accredited academic institutions only. Please contact Darden Business Publishing to learn about available discount pricing for your school. 

  

Title:  Medtronic, Inc. (A): The Garage Era 

Type: Case
Authors: Glinska, Malgorzata (Gosia)
Date: 9/17/2008
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Useful in courses on entrepreneurship, this case describes the founding and start-up years (194962) of Medtronic, Inc., one of the world's leading medical-technology companies, specializing in implantable and interventional therapies. Focusing on one of the company's cofounders, Earl Bakken, the case examines entrepreneurial thinking and principles: "effectual reasoning." See also "What Makes Entrepreneurs Entrepreneurial?" (UVA-ENT-0065). 

  

Title:  Sammy Snacks (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/17/2008
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia 

Sam, a Labrador retriever, has inspired a retail business start-up that sells superpremium pet food. As the company begins to expand its retail footprint, the founder considers two options with different operational implications. See also the B case (UVA-OM-1350). 

  

Title:  Levy Restaurants

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/12/2008
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Growing from a passive investment in a Chicago delicatessen in 1978, into a national foodservice company by 2007, Levy Restaurants served approximately 63 million customers a year at more than 85 different restaurants and sporting and entertainment venues. Then Levy expanded its fine-dining restaurant business into sports and entertainment venues and such unexpected places as Disney World. Levy grew at greater than 20% compounded growth rates between 1999 and 2007 because of a plethora of newly constructed baseball, football, basketball, and hockey arenas and stadiums. When construction growth leveled off, Levy responded by expanding into entertainment venues. How could Levy maintain its stellar growth rate? Levy's answer to this question depended, in part, on how it defined its core competencies; it needed to decide whether it was a fine-dining company or a foodservice company and how its customer-value proposition differed from its competitors. Levy had to determine which new customer segments to expand and whether to grow, maintain, or shrink its restaurant business. 

  

Title:  Room & Board 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/12/2008
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Room & Board's story was one of contrarian success as a retail-furniture company that abandoned the standard retail-industry business model, disavowed debt and equity-growth financing, and embraced a unique multiple-stakeholder model that valued quality and relationships ahead of the bottom line while producing stellar financial results. Its culture supported an energized, positive growth environment for its employees that fostered high employee engagement and, in turn, high customer engagement. Now the founder was confronting his biggest challenge: how to institutionalize the unusual business model, culture, and employee environment he has built. His primary objective is to preserve and protect his "relationship" business model, which is the heart and soul of Room & Board's success. 

  

Title: McDonald's Corporation 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/12/2008
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

In December 2007, McDonald's had a market capitalization of $69.5 billion, and its stock price was hovering around its all-time high of $58 to $60 since the last split, in February 1999. While McDonald's was enjoying its five-year consecutive sales increases and high stock price, the management team was determined to improve customer experience, foster customer loyalty, and pave an enduring growth path into the future. Its big challenge remained how to increase employee engagement to drive more customer satisfaction.    

Page 3

Title: Edens & Avant  

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 7/30/2008
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Edens & Avant, the largest private owner of neighborhood retail shopping centers in the United States, is a full-service real-estate development and management company involved in the design, construction, leasing, management, and rehabilitation of retail and retail-mixed-use properties. Started by Joe Edens in 1967 and owned primarily by the Edens family, the business has provided financial security for his family and its employees and has made major contributions to the surrounding community. So as Edens tries to decide which of three candidates will be his successor, he knows that his choice is critical and concerns many people.  

    

Title: C.R. Barger & Sons, Inc. (B)  

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 4/8/2008
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The president of Precast Concrete Operations (PCO) at C.R. Barger & Sons has grown the division into a leader in the industry. As a result, his former challenges have changed dramatically-from how to save the PCO division to how to duplicate and improve on the results of his growth initiatives. And he now was considering whether to build a new PCO plant to accommodate future growth. The new plant would increase Barger's production capacity allowing it to expand its concrete-production capacity from 40 to 200 cubic yards per day. Students may examine the multifaceted strategy the president used to revitalize the division and decide whether this large new growth investment is justified.  

  

Title: C.R. Barger & Sons, Inc. (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 3/25/2008
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 C.R. Barger & Sons, Inc. operated two businesses: It installed gas, water, and sewer lines, and it manufactured and sold precast-concrete septic tanks. In 2002, after 35 years as a local supplier of septic tanks, this end of the Barger business had reached a plateau: Barger did not have a distinctive brand or product, and its sales were limited primarily to East Tennessee. Barger was on the verge of closing down its septic-tank business when, in 2004, the founders' grandson assumed leadership of Precast Concrete Operations. The challenge he faced was how to take a nondistinctive commodity product and turn it into a viable growth business. 

  

Title:  Students Helping Honduras 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 2/28/2008
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Students Helping Honduras (SHH) was a student-founded, student-led nonprofit organization dedicated to helping Hondurans escape from the cycle of poverty. SHH accomplished this by engaging college students in its projects from beginning to end. It operated with a yearly budget, augmented by student fundraisers and a grant from the Sunshine Lady Foundation-the private foundation of Doris Buffett. By the summer of 2008, SHH had three full-time employees living in Honduras and an ambitious business plan: The organization wanted to expand its college chapters, substantially increase its student-volunteer visits and summer service-learning internships, continue its three existing projects, and begin three new ones. Progress was slowed, however, by limited resources-people and money. Having given money to SHH already to partially fund its operating costs for 2008-09, the Sunshine Lady Foundation felt it had served its purpose and would not fund more operating expenses. Faced with this difficult financial reality, the SHH Leadership Team questioned SHH's future. How should it proceed and how should it prioritize its many opportunities? 

  

Title: Dave Lindsey @ Defender Direct: A Business of Growing Leaders 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 1/30/2008
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Defender Direct, Inc., headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, was a privately held company that sold and installed ADT security systems and Dish Network Satellite TV to homeowners in the United States. President and CEO Dave Lindsey started the business out of his home in 1998. Under his leadership, Defender experienced an average annual growth rate of 60%, and in 2008 it became one of the largest security and satellite dealers in the Midwest, generating $150 million in revenues. The founder, who was fond of saying that "businesses don't grow people do," credited the Defender culture for his company's stellar growth.  

  

Title: Jeff Bowling @ the Delta Companies: From Baseball Coach to CEO 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 12/17/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The Delta Companies, essentially a sales organization, was forced to morph quickly into a full-fledged healthcare staffing and recruiting business headed by a CEO who was a former baseball coach with no business background. But he knew enough to invest heavily in technology and to continuously look for ways to improve financial information flow to take advantage of Delta's stellar growth that was fueled by a doctor shortage. Part of the company's success was attributed to its culture, which was driven by its employees. By 2008, Delta had moved up 589 spots on the Inc. 5000 list of America's Fastest-Growing Companies. Despite his company's continuing growth, the CEO did not intend to rest on his laurels. 

  

Title:  SYSCO Corporation 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 12/17/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 As a major player in a $200 billion market with only a 15% market share, SYSCO outperforms its industry competition. This execution champion and organic growth winner has figured out how to balance and manage tensions between decentralized entrepreneurial autonomy and centralized controls. But what makes SYSCO different is that its leaders have figured out, on a daily basis, how to keep everyone, from the CEO to the truck driver, focused on the details that count to customers. In 2005, however, the growth of its underlying market had leveled forcing the company to face the challenge of continuing to grow and maintain its margins in a plateauing market. 

  

Title:  Tiffany & Company 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 11/29/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Tiffany & Company was the leading U.S. luxury jewelry brand, generating more than $2.6 billion in revenue through 167 retail outlets globally and from catalogue and Internet sales. For nearly 170 years, Tiffany had managed its brand. In February 2007, a hedge fund, Trian Fund Management LP, announced that it had bought a 5.5% stake in Tiffany, and become its largest shareholder. Trian believed that Tiffany was undervalued and stated that it wanted to help the company "improve its earnings per share by addressing various operational and strategic issues." In response, Tiffany began to consider different actions to increase shareholder value.  

  

Title:  Best Buy Co., Inc. 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 11/15/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 2007, Best Buy was the leading electronics retailer in the United States with more than 941 stores, revenue totaling $31 billion, and a market cap of $21 billion. In 2005, Best Buy had adopted a new business model, culture, and customer-segmentation template called Customer Centricity. This move created volatility in the price of Best Buy stock because of the higher-than-expected employee costs that went with this new way of doing business and the difficulty of executing the old and the new business models simultaneously while the new model was rolled out. Best Buy responded to Wall Street's short-term focus in a myriad of ways. It first asked for investor patience, and stressed the strong operating results achieved in Best Buy stores operating under the new model. But in June 2007, after the stock dropped again, the CEO knew he had to decide whether to open more Best Buy stores, increase the company's dividend, or increase the stock-repurchase program. 

  

Title: United Parcel Service of America, Inc. 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 11/9/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


UPS had become a global public company, with a market cap of $74 billion, more than 428,000 employees, $47 billion in revenue, and operations in more than 200 countries. A recognized leader among package-delivery companies, its growth had been above industry averages and had historically been through geographical expansion. In 1998, UPS changed its business model to Synchronized Commerce and adopted a new growth strategy called the Four Quadrant Model, hoping to expand its market space by transforming itself into a logistics-solutions company. But eight years after these changes, UPS was generating only 17% of its revenue from its nonpackage deliveries, with only $2 million of its operating profit coming from the new businesses. In the company's 2006 Annual Report, the UPS chairman and CEO acknowledged the disappointing results and realized that these results required a response to the public market. 

  

Title: The Home Depot, Inc. 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 10/24/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The Home Depot case is a great story. It's about entrepreneurship, growth, CEO leadership, and the dramatic impact, good and bad, a CEO can have on a company's growth culture, strategy, and performance. Home Depot had faced market growth challenges for the last seven years as it tried in numerous ways to reignite its growth engine. The case explores the growth strategies of CEOs Bernie Marcus, Arthur Blank, and Blank's successor Bob Nardelli, a former GE executive. After examining Home Depot's growth history, the case challenges students to devise a growth strategy for the company under a new CEO.  

  

Title:  The Coca-Cola Company 

Type: Case
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/20/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Coca-Cola was the world's largest manufacturer and distributor of nonalcoholic beverage syrups and concentrates, selling over $24 billion of products in 2006 in more than 200 hundred countries. It became a high-growth company under Roberto Goizueta who was president and then chairman and CEO from 1980 until his death in 1997. Under Goizueta's leadership, Coca-Cola's market cap grew from $4.3 billion to $180 billion, but since his death in 1997, it has declined to under $115 billion, and for the first time in their long competition Pepsi-Cola has a larger market cap. Coca-Cola needs a blockbuster break-out growth idea to transform it and its culture. Coca-Cola needs to show Wall Street that it is not wedded to its legacy model and that it can be a growth company again.  

  

Title:  Tiffany & Company (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/20/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Tiffany & Company was the leading U.S. luxury jewelry brand, generating more than $2.6 billion in revenue through 167 retail outlets globally and from catalogue and Internet sales. For nearly 170 years, Tiffany had managed its brand. In February 2007, a hedge fund, Trian Fund Management LP, announced that it had bought a 5.5% stake in Tiffany, and become its largest shareholder. Trian believed that Tiffany was undervalued and stated that it wanted to help the company "improve its earnings per share by addressing various operational and strategic issues." In response, Tiffany began to consider different actions to increase shareholder value.  

Page 4

Title:  Best Buy Co., Inc. (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/19/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 2007, Best Buy was the leading electronics retailer in the United States with more than 941 stores, revenue totaling $31 billion, and a market cap of $21 billion. In 2005, Best Buy had adopted a new business model, culture, and customer-segmentation template called Customer Centricity. This move created volatility in the price of Best Buy stock because of the higher-than-expected employee costs that went with this new way of doing business and the difficulty of executing the old and the new business models simultaneously while the new model was rolled out. Best Buy responded to Wall Street's short-term focus in a myriad of ways. It first asked for investor patience, and stressed the strong operating results achieved in Best Buy stores operating under the new model. But in June 2007, after the stock dropped again, the CEO knew he had to decide whether to open more Best Buy stores, increase the company's dividend, or increase the stock-repurchase program. 

  

Title:  United Parcel Service of America, Inc. (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Hess, Edward )
Date: 9/19/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


UPS had become a global public company, with a market cap of $74 billion, more than 428,000 employees, $47 billion in revenue, and operations in more than 200 countries. A recognized leader among package-delivery companies, its growth had been above industry averages and had historically been through geographical expansion. In 1998, UPS changed its business model to Synchronized Commerce and adopted a new growth strategy called the Four Quadrant Model, hoping to expand its market space by transforming itself into a logistics-solutions company. But eight years after these changes, UPS was generating only 17% of its revenue from its nonpackage deliveries, with only $2 million of its operating profit coming from the new businesses. In the company's 2006 Annual Report, the UPS chairman and CEO acknowledged the disappointing results and realized that these results required a response to the public market.  

  

Title: The Home Depot, Inc. (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Hess, Edward
Date: 9/18/2007
Subject Area: Strategy
Format:  Cases and Multimedia 


The Home Depot case is a great story. It's about entrepreneurship, growth, CEO leadership, and the dramatic impact, good and bad, a CEO can have on a company's growth culture, strategy, and performance. Home Depot had faced market growth challenges for the last seven years as it tried in numerous ways to reignite its growth engine. The case explores the growth strategies of CEOs Bernie Marcus, Arthur Blank, and Blank's successor Bob Nardelli, a former GE executive. After examining Home Depot's growth history, the case challenges students to devise a growth strategy for the company under a new CEO. 

  

Title: Method: Entrepreneurial Innovation, Health, Environment, and Sustainable Business Design (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 9/18/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


With Method standing at number seven on Inc. magazine's list of the 500 fastest-growing companies in 2006, cofounder Adam Lowry is searching for a biodegradable cleaning cloth to expand Method's line of "green" household products. Sustainable design principles have been a guiding force in Method's strategy, and being biofriendly is critical. So is sourcing in the United States. But only China can manufacture the corn-based cloth Lowry has in mind, and there is no way to certify that the product is free of genetically modified organisms. Lowry has to balance his firm's fundamental commitment to environmental sustainability against the fact that some retailers refuse to carry products containing GMOs. 

  

Title: Shaw Industries: Sustainable Business, Entrepreneurial Innovation, and Green Chemistry 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 9/5/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Shaw Industries, a leading U.S. global manufacturer of floor coverings, produced EcoWorx technology to create a carpet tile that is PVC-free and able to be recycled, upon return to the company, as a carpet tile of equal quality and performance. Using green chemistry, the company has created a sustainable business innovation that cut costs, improves revenues, positively influences health and the environment, improves the brand, and enhances Shaw's strategic positioning going forward. The case explores drivers of change toward sustainably designed floor coverings and EcoWork as example of innovative change using sustainability framework. 

  

Title: Rohner Textiles: Cradle-to-cradle Innovation and Sustainability 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 9/5/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This minicase is one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This case describes the supply chain management and internal changes by Swiss firm Rohner, a commercial fabric manufacturer, as it transformed its strategy from conventional production to benign fabric based on the application of cradle-to-cradle design. The case illustrates the way firms can turn sustainability ideas into growth and differentiation opportunities. 

  

Title: Wall-to-Wall Carpet Goes Cradle-to-Cradle 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 8/29/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This minicase is one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This one features Shaw Industries, a leading U.S. global manufacturer of floor coverings, which developed EcoWorx technology to create a carpet tile that is PVC-free and able to be recycled, upon return to the company, as a carpet tile of equal quality and performance. Using green chemistry, the company has created a sustainable business innovation that cut costs, improves revenues, positively influences health and the environment, improves the brand, and enhances Shaw's strategic positioning going forward. 

  

Title: Environmental Health: Chemicals in Breast Milk 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: Larson, Andrea 8/29/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Although breast milk is recognized by doctors, public health officials, and scientists as the best first food for an infant, it is not pure. Many synthetic chemicals released into the environment, intentionally or not, can be found in breast milk. Chemicals such as famous "bad actors" like dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane, commonly known as DDT, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), as well as less well-known substances such as flame retardants (polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs), have been detected in human breast milk around the world. Many of those synthetic chemicals are known or suspected causes of cancer, and they have been linked to other health problems such as diabetes, reproductive disorders, and impaired brain development. The health benefits of breastfeeding far outweigh the possible negative effects of chemical contaminants in breast milk, but the presence of those chemicals remains a cause for concern among health officials, individuals, and the companies whose products or manufacturing process release toxins into our environment. 

  

Title: Illustrating the Financial Benefits of Green Chemistry 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 8/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This technical note forms the basis of a discussion on the economic value added of green chemistry principles. Students can learn how to increase NOPAT by increasing sales; increase NOPAT by decreasing operating expenses; reduce WACC, driving down risk by decreasing risk perceived by capital providers; and reduce invested capital. A grid showing green chemistry principles and how adhering to each might affect the bottom line provides an excellent context in which to discuss business strategies. 

  

Title: Frito-Lay North America: The Making of a Net-Zero Snack Chip (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 6/4/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Implementing a sustainability strategy requires firms to consider economic, strategic, environmental, and community perspectives. Suitable for MBA, undergraduate, and executive learners, this sustainability case covers innovation, intrapreneurship, and strategy. An Excel carbon footprint analysis exercise accompanies the case; a technical note entitled, "Corporate Greenhouse Accounting: Carbon Footprint Analysis" (UVA-ENT-0113) is an effective complement. Frito-Lay's Arizona facility pilots a program to take its snack chip manufacturing off the grid. Decision makers discuss operating, financial, marketing, and corporate strategy as the facility calculates its carbon footprint, converts to non-fossil-fuel energy sources, and stops relying on the scarce local water supply. 

  

Title: Frito-Lay North America: The Making of a Net-Zero Snack Chip 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Implementing a sustainability strategy requires firms to consider economic, strategic, environmental, and community perspectives. Suitable for MBA, undergraduate, and executive learners, this sustainability case covers innovation, intrapreneurship, and strategy. An Excel carbon footprint analysis exercise accompanies the case; a technical note entitled, "Corporate Greenhouse Accounting: Carbon Footprint Analysis" (UVA-ENT-0113) is an effective complement. Frito-Lay's Arizona facility pilots a program to take its snack chip manufacturing off the grid. Decision makers discuss operating, financial, marketing, and corporate strategy as the facility calculates its carbon footprint, converts to non-fossil-fuel energy sources, and stops relying on the scarce local water supply. 

  

Title: Corporate Greenhouse Gas Accounting: Carbon Footprint Analysis 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Stakeholder climate change actions worldwide have prompted companies to measure their greenhouse gas emissions and reduce their carbon footprints by decreasing energy and fuel use. In the process, they are cutting costs, decreasing exposure to severe weather, reducing energy vulnerability, and potentially opening up revenue sources for carbon credit sales in the emerging markets for carbon trading. This note is effective in MBA, undergraduate, and executive education courses on clean commerce innovation, carbon markets, sustainability, and environmental and regulatory issues. This technical note stands alone and also works as a companion note to "Frito-Lay North America: The Making of a Net-Zero Snack Chip" (UVA-ENT-0112). For instructors, a teaching note is available, along with a supplemental Excel spreadsheet for use in performing carbon emissions calculations. 

  

Title: WOMEN'S WORLD BANKING: THE EARLY YEARS 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case serves multiple teaching purposes. It can be used effectively in an entrepreneurship course or for a discussion of entrepreneurship in the context of nonprofit organizations. Women's World Banking (WWB) is a unique worldwide financial institution that serves as an international model for the delivery of credit and management expertise to microbusinesses in less-developed economies. WWB represents the breakthrough innovation in market creation, product development, and new organizational forms discussed by Joseph Schumpeter (an economist who studied entrepreneurship). The organization is a network that operates with autonomous affiliates connected in a global web. The case focuses on the creation of the organization and its founding entrepreneur. It is a useful tool for discussing the characteristics of entrepreneurial founders, innovation, and growth challenges in the early years. It can be used effectively with the Harvard Business School case on Women's World Banking to discuss leadership succession and further challenges of rapid growth. 

  

Title:  SC Johnson's Greenlist: Health, Ecology, Profits 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This minicase is one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. SC Johnson developed its GreenList to screen chemicals and avoid incorporating hazardous and toxic materials into its household cleaning product lines. This minicase discusses the list and how the company has benefited in the marketplace by being out front with a solutions-oriented approach. 

  

Title: Natureworks: Green Chemistry's Contribution to Biotechnology, Innovation, Commercialization, and Strategic Positioning 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


In 2002, NatureWorks LLC, a small subsidiary of U.S. agricultural giant Cargill Inc., was recognized for its development of the first synthetic polymer class to be produced from renewable resources, specifically from corn grown in the American midwest. The product held the potential to substitute a renewable feedstock for petroleum-based polymers. With this enormous vote of confidence, the company was poised to move forward from a niche market in which it was selling tens of thousands of tons polylactic acid to a mainstream one with possibly hundreds of thousands of tons in sales. But how could it position itself to do so profitably?  

Page 5

Title: An Overview of the Historical Context for Sustainable Business in the United States, 1960-2000

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The concept of sustainable business is a powerful new perspective on creating value for multiple stakeholders. It links the previously conflicting interests of economic efficiency, social equity, and environmental protection. This technical note describes the historical background that has framed the transition from environmental battles to sustainable business and adds context to the discussion of sustainable business practices in the note "The Path to Sustainable Business: Environmental Frameworks, Practices, and Related Tools" (UVA-ENT-0033) and other environmental cases.  

  

Title: The New Strategic Frontier: Environment, Sustainability, and Entrepreneurial Innovation 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


A new frontier of innovation exists where economic and population growth collides with natural systems (the environment). This note details the changing character of environmental issues and outlines the opportunities for entrepreneurial thinkers. It provides excellent fodder for discussion of sustainability as an opportunity for corporate innovation.  

  

Title: Method: Sustainable Design for the Home as Corporate Strategy 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 4/9/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This minicase is one of 10 in a series written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. Method is a successful startup firm in San Francisco that has made sustainable design principles a guiding force its strategy. Unlike other firms, however, Method sells its products on performance, price, and aesthetics; health and environment are simply built into the design from the outset. Backed by venture capital and successful selling through Target nationwide, Method offers a model of what may ultimately become standard practice and strategy.  

  

Title: Bank of America Tower: Redesigning Skyscrapers 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 3/26/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase describes Bank of America's new headquarters building in New York City focusing on the "green" or sustainable design features used and anticipated benefits. 

  

Title:  Coastwide Labs: Product and Strategy Redesign in Commerical Cleaning Products 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 3/14/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. The Coastwide Labs minicase traces the development of a successful sustainability strategy implemented by an industrial and commercial cleaning products company. 

  

Title: Shaw Industries: EcoWorx and Cradle-to-Cradle Innovation in Carpet Tile 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 3/14/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase documents the technology and systems innovations behind Shaw's successful introduction of closed loop recyclable carpet tiles (EcoWorx), a disruptive innovation in the flooring industry. 

  

Title: Nike: Moving Down the Sustainability Track Through Chemical Substitution and Waste Reduction 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/31/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase discusses the formation and implementation of Nike's sustainability strategy in the 1990s through 2006 including changes to product designs and supply chain policies. 

  

Title: East West Partners: Sustainability Strategy in Real Estate Development and Ski Resorts 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/31/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase describes the creative and innovative ways sustainability goals were integrated into a development project called Northstar Tahoe, creating a model for real estate and ski resort design to protect community and environmental interests while contributing to the company's business success and brand recognition.  

  

Title: NatureWorks: Biotech Innovation, Sustainable Business, and Corn-based Plastic 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/31/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase on NatureWorks traces the development of an entrepreneurial venture within a large corporate parent company. Bioplastic material was brought to market. The case describes the challenges and successes of a product and a business based on sustainability concepts. 

  

Title: Telework at AT&T: Strategy and Systems Thinking 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/31/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a minicase, one of 10 in a set of short cases written to illustrate the business benefits companies realize through adopting sustainable business strategies. This minicase discusses AT&T's adoption of telework before it was commonly done as an example of implementing sustainable business practices. 

  

Title: Method: Entrepreneurial Innovation, Health, Environment, and Sustainable Business Design 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/30/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


With Method standing at number seven on Inc. magazine's list of the 500 fastest-growing companies in 2006, cofounder Adam Lowry is searching for a biodegradable cleaning cloth to expand Method's line of "green" household products. Sustainable design principles have been a guiding force in Method's strategy, and being biofriendly is critical. So is sourcing in the United States. But only China can manufacture the corn-based cloth Lowry has in mind, and there is no way to certify that the product is free of genetically modified organisms. Lowry has to balance his firm's fundamental commitment to environmental sustainability against the fact that some retailers refuse to carry products containing GMOs. 

  

Title: Walden Paddlers 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/29/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case describes the process that entrepreneur Paul Farrow went through to establish his kayak company between 1992 and 1996. After being laid off from a more traditional corporate position, Farrow came across an idea that suited his business skills, experience, and values. The case chronicles the steps he took to be the first in the industry to design and produce an inexpensive, high-performance recreational kayak from recycled plastic materials. Key to Walden Paddlers' $1 million sales in 1995 was the company's ability to forge close alliances with key suppliers and customers while keeping fixed costs down by managing a virtual corporation. 

  

Title:  The Science of Climate Change 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/18/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia
 

 The scientific consensus on climate change's origins in human activities has begun to influence international law and corporate policies. This technical note is one of a three-part introductory series on global climate change (see also "The Challenge of Climate Change: Overview" [UVA-ENT-0036] and "Government and Corporate Response to Climate Change" [UVA-ENT-0038]). International concern over global climate change began in the late twentieth century, when scientists saw a correlation among increasing atmospheric concentrations of certain gases, human activities emitting those gases, and an unusual increase in global ambient temperature readings. The scientific community was joined by international policy makers who grew concerned about reports of climate-change impacts, ranging from melting polar icecaps to regional flooding, drought, and extreme-weather events. While a small number of scientists disagree, a significant majority of researchers suggest that prudence requires action to reduce human contributions to atmospheric pollutants that cause the greenhouse effect. 

  

Title: Government and Corporate Response to Climate Change 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 1/18/2007
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Governments around the world have accepted the consensus of the international scientific community that global climate change is occurring. Human activities, particularly fossil-fuel use and certain agricultural practices, have led to higher-than-normal concentrations of certain gases in the atmosphere, notably carbon dioxide. These "greenhouse" gases trap heat near the earth and are the cause of climate change. Policy makers have rallied to build an international strategy to limit further greenhouse-gas emissions and manage the impacts of climate change. Global businesses, many of which initially balked at potential economic disruption from changes in the use of fossil fuel and other business practices, have begun to accept the need for change. This technical note explores international, political, and corporate responses to the impacts, risks, and opportunities associated with climate change. This note is the third in a series of three related notes on climate change; see also "The Challenge of Climate Change: Overview" (UVA-ENT-0036) and "The Science of Climate Change" (UVA-ENT-0037).   

Page 6

Title: Toxic Chemicals: Responding to Challenges and Opportunities 

Type: Case
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 12/6/2006
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The growing impact of toxic chemical use is a major issue corporations face in the 21st century. This note offers an overview of the effects of toxins on human health and the natural environment: Cancer, nervous system disorders caused by workplace exposure. Impaired endocrine, reproductive, and immune systems. Impeded physical nad intellectual development. All are attributed to toxic exposure-sometimes even at very low levels. Toxic chemicals-ubiquitous in industrial processes and consumer products-represent both challenges and opportunities for business. One approach reduces a company's use of chemicals identified as problematic for human and ecosystem health. A second approach designs hazardous materials out of products or recaptures toxins in closed-loop cycles to be productively used again. Companies moving from a reactive stance to the redesign of products and processes not only reduce liability but differentiate their products and brands for competitive advantage. 

  

Title: Hybrid Cars: Responding to New Technology in the Industry (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 12/5/2006
Subject Area:  
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 Do hybrid electric vehicles represent the future in fuel-efficient vehicles? Or will they merely serve as a short-term solution? Through text, video, and animation, this multimedia case demonstrates how what was once peripheral-in this instance, the public's environmental concerns-can become relevant to strategic planning. Considering how to position a company for a future in which hybrid vehicles may, or may not, play a significant role helps students to develop insight into decision-making on (1) strategic positioning, (2) technology choices, and (3) investment regarding hybrid or other alternative propulsion systems. 

  

Title: Walden Paddlers (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Larson, Andrea
Date: 11/9/2006
Subject Area:
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 This case describes the process that entrepreneur Paul Farrow went through to establish his kayak company between 1992 and 1996. After being laid off from a more traditional corporate position, Farrow came across an idea that suited his business skills, experience, and values. The case chronicles the steps he took to be the first in the industry to design and produce an inexpensive, high-performance recreational kayak from recycled plastic materials. Key to Walden Paddlers' $1 million sales in 1995 was the company's ability to forge close alliances with key suppliers and customers while keeping fixed costs down by managing a virtual corporation. 

 

  

Title: Competition and Collaboration in the PC Industry: The Evolution of a Value Chain (C) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 11/9/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 Dell clung to the top spot among PC makers in 2006, when it shipped just over 38 million computers-only about 20,000 more than rival Hewlett-Packard (HP), which acquired Compaq in 2001. HP also reported gains in the fast-growing laptop segment, mostly at the expense of Dell. After HP and Dell, the next three largest PC makers in 2006 were all based outside the United States: Lenovo of China (which purchased IBM's PC division in 2001), Acer of Taiwan, and Toshiba of Japan. Analysts observed that competitors had found ways to duplicate much of Dell's operations. See also the A and B cases (UVA-BP-0518 and UVA-BP-0519). 

  

Title: Competition and Collaboration in the PC Industry: The Evolution of a Value Chain (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 9/16/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The B case examines the shifting dynamics as Intel and Microsoft assert their dominance over the box makers. By 2001, Compaq was toppled as the world's largest PC maker. Intel remained the world's largest processor maker and Microsoft remained a software giant. But a company founded in 1984 by a University of Texas student had taken its place as a powerhouse in the "Wintel" value chain. That company was Dell. See the A case (UVA-BP-0518) and C case (UVA-BP-0520). 

  

Title:  Competition and Collaboration in the PC Industry: The Evolution of a Value Chain (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 9/7/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The three cases in this series trace developments in the personal computer industry from its inception through 2006, making it possible to examine the issues of collaboration and competition as the value chain in the industry evolves. The A case looks at these tensions through the lens of the relationship between two for the industries' most successful firms-Compaq and Intel. As the A case describes, by the mid-1990s, Compaq was the world's largest PC manufacturer. Compaq's computers used Microsoft software and Intel processors. Compaq was Intel's largest customer and Intel was Compaq's largest supplier. Not surprisingly, then, it caused quite a stir when executives from Compaq and Intel entered into a heated public spat at a September 1994 European technology conference. See the B case (UVA-BP-0519) and C case (UVA-BP-0520). 

  

Title: Strategic Planning at the New York Botanical Garden (C) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 7/18/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 This case series (see also the A [UVA-BP-0383] and B [UVA-BP-0384] cases) traces the formulation and implementation of a strategic plan for the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), and profiles, in detail, the highly inclusive and original planning process used. The NYBG planning process reflects many of the themes of creativity, inclusiveness, and vision that characterize the concepts of strategic thinking, collaboration, and empowerment so prevalent in recent business discussions. The C case updates the series to November 2007 as the Garden's Board of Managers considers the latest strategic plan. 

  

Title: Scenario Planning 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 3/20/2006
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 This note reviews the purposes, methods, and uses of scenario planning for strategic decision making under uncertainty.  

  

Title: Leading Change at PPF Corporation (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/27/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The B case continues the story of Stephen Oswald's leadership by examining the actions he took during his first three years at the corporation. See also the A case (UVA-BP-0498). 

  

Title: Leading Change at PPF Corporation (A) and (B) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/9/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The A case begins with the arrival of a new leader at a troubled firm. Faced with a myriad of issues about both the leadership and the strategy of the organization, Stephen Oswald must prioritize what to tackle and how. See also the B case (UVA-BP-0499). 

  

Title: Leading Change at PPF Corporation (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/9/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The A case begins with the arrival of a new leader at a troubled firm. Faced with a myriad of issues about both the leadership and the strategy of the organization, Stephen Oswald must prioritize what to tackle and how. See also the B case (UVA-BP-0499).  

  

Title: Piaggio (A) and (B) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/9/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 Piaggio, manufacturer of the Vespa motor scooter, faces the decision of whether to outsource production of a new engine. The decision in the A case is couched in uncertainty over the achievable sales volume for the engine, particularly as new and less expensive competitor products are gaining popularity. The case provides an overview of the competitive style of each of the major manufacturers and allows a discussion of core capabilities of these competitors. The B case describes what happens in the market and to Piaggio after the company has built the engine.  

  

Title:  Banc One Corporation (Abridged) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/9/2006
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 The year 1992 had proved to be the most successful year in Banc One Corporation's history. Its highlights included (1) the completion of a series of acquisitions that made Banc One the nation's ninth largest bank, (2) a 32% increase in earnings that extended the bank's record of consecutive annual earnings-per-share increases to 24 years, and (3) a 10-year average return on equity and assets that placed it first among the 25 largest U.S. banks. In 1991, Institutional Investor termed the firm "America's best-run bank."  

  

Title: Charlottesville-Albemarle Legal Aid Society (C): 10 Years Later 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/7/2006
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 This case series deals with the situation facing the director of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Legal Aid Society, a federally supported nonprofit organization chartered to provide legal services to low-income people involved in noncriminal cases. Legal Aid has entered a challenging time in its history: Funding is decreasing while demand for services is growing. The director is struggling with how to forge a new strategy for the organization in an environment where resources are stretched thin and stakeholders do not agree about where the organization's efforts should be focused. The C case provides an update 10 years after the A case (UVA-BP-0377). See also the B case (UVA-BP-0516). 

Page 7

Title: Iran Office Automation Company 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/6/2006
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Set in Iran in January 1995, this case concerns a choice that the owners of a family business must make among several strategic options for future growth and diversification in the face of Iran's deteriorating economy. The case encourages students to go through the various steps of a comprehensive strategic analysis, ranging from the identification of core capabilities and Porter's "Five Competitive Forces" to evaluation of strategic fit and strategic alliances. The case also highlights the importance of strategic fit in the face of new opportunities and limited resources. The narrowness of the presented windows of opportunity creates a sense of urgency that might prompt students to overlook strategic fit and reach premature decisions.  

  

Title: COPELAND CORPORATION/BAIN & COMPANY: THE SCROLL INVESTMENT DECISION (VIDEO) 

Type: VHS Supplement
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 12/4/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia
  
Color. 23 minutes. Video. VHS and DVD.    

Title: COPELAND CORPORATION/BAIN & COMPANY: THE SCROLL INVESTMENT DECISION (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 10/6/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

In this case, Copeland executives have hired Bain & Company, a management-consulting firm, to make recommendations about a capital-appropriations request. The case can be used in conjunction with the Darden video module "Copeland/Bain" (#4352).   

Title: COPELAND CORPORATION/BAIN & COMPANY: THE SCROLL INVESTMENT DECISION 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 9/26/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 In this case, Copeland executives have hired Bain & Company, a management-consulting firm, to make recommendations about a capital-appropriations request. The case can be used in conjunction with the Darden video module "Copeland/Bain" (#4352). 

  

Title: Walt Disney Productions (A) and (B) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 9/13/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


This case is a summary of the history of Walt Disney Productions from its founding by Walt Disney in the 1920s to 1984. Faced with declining performance in virtually all divisions of the company, top management must develop a long-term strategy for improving the company's performance. The case addresses the question of how to restore the value of the asset base built by Walt Disney. The case also addresses two broad issues: (1) leadership and (2) qualities of an "excellent" company. The case has sufficient material on the start-up and early days of Walt Disney Productions that students can assess some of the qualities that made Walt Disney a successful entrepreneur and creative leader. See also "The Walt Disney Company: The Arrival of Eisner and Wells" (BP-0339). 

  

Title: Walt Disney Productions: The Walt Years (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 8/13/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case is a summary of the history of Walt Disney Productions from its founding by Walt Disney in the 1920s to 1984. Faced with declining performance in virtually all divisions of the company, top management must develop a long-term strategy for improving the company's performance...

  

Title: STRATEGIC PLANNING AT THE NEW YORK BOTANICAL GARDEN (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 8/13/2005
Subject Area: Accounting and Control
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case series (see also the B case, BP-0384) traces the formulation and implementation of a strategic plan for the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), and profiles, in detail, the highly inclusive and original planning process used. The NYBG planning process reflects many of the themes of creativity, inclusiveness, and vision that characterize the concepts of strategic thinking, collaboration, and empowerment so prevalent in recent business discussions. The A case opens in early 1993, and describes the process used to produce the plan, which included the participation of staff at every level. 

  

Title: Piaggio (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 3/18/2005
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Piaggio, manufacturer of the Vespa motor scooter, must decide whether to outsource production of a new engine. The decision is surrounded by uncertainty about the achievable sales volume for the engine, particularly as competitors' new and less expensive products are gaining popularity. The A case (UVA-BP-0415) provides an overview of the competitive style of each of the major manufacturers and affords a discussion of their core capabilities. The B case describes what happens in the market and to Piaggio after the company has built the engine. 

  

Title: THE WALT DISNEY COMPANY: THE ARRIVAL OF EISNER AND WELLS (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 1/31/2005
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case begins in mid-1984 with the arrival of the Eisner-Wells team to head Disney Productions. It lays out the specific actions taken by the new management team in each area of Disney's business, and contains excerpts from Eisner and Wells's first letter to shareholders. See also "Disney Productions: The Walt Years" (BP-0332). 

  

Title: The Yellow Pages Engagement 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 11/30/2004
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case focuses on the creation of a work plan for a consulting engagement.  

  

Title: Carrier and Tyler Refrigeration: An Acquisition For Growth 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 7/19/2004
Subject Area: Finance
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Carrier, a division of mulitbusiness United Technologies Corporation (UTC), is looking for ways to grow its business. Carrier is considering expansion into commercial refrigeration and is examining a proposed purchase of Tyler Corporation--a major player in the display-case market. The case provides detail on various segments of the heating and cooling markets and thus allows analysis of the attractiveness of these segments to Carrier. The case also provides detailed forecasts for students to use in valuing the target, Tyler. The mechanics of a basic valuation are straightforward. There are, however, several opportunities for a more refined analysis.  

  

Title: Strategic Planning at the New York Botanical Garden (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 7/7/2004
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case series (see also the A case, UVA-BP-0383) traces the formulation and implementation of a strategic plan for the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), and profiles, in detail, the highly inclusive and original planning process used. The NYBG planning process reflects many of the themes of creativity, inclusiveness, and vision that characterize the concepts of strategic thinking, collaboration, and empowerment so prevalent in recent business discussions. The B case takes place in 1997, five years into the plan's seven-year time horizon. It reviews the dramatic successes the plan has made possible at the Garden. 

  

Title: Using Hypothesis-Driven Thinking in Strategy Consulting 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/19/2004
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This technical note describes the process of hypothesis-driven thinking, using examples from strategy consulting, medicine, and architecture. Associated with the scientific method, hypothesis-driven thinking focuses on the creative generation of alternative hypotheses and on their subsequent validation or refutation through the use of data. Hypothesis generation asks the creative question, "What if ...?" Hypothesis testing follows with "If ..., then ..." and brings relevant data to bear on the analysis. Taken together, and repeated over time, this sequence allows us to pose ever-improving hypotheses without forfeiting the ability to explore new ideas. 

  

Title: Charlottesville-Albemarle Legal Aid Society (A), (B), and (C) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 2/2/2004
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia 


This case series deals with the situation facing the director of the Charlottesville-Albemarle Legal Aid Society, a federally supported nonprofit organization chartered to provide legal services to low-income people involved in noncriminal cases. Legal Aid has entered a challenging time in its history: Funding is decreasing while demand for services is growing. The director is struggling with how to forge a new strategy for the organization in an environment where resources are stretched thin and stakeholders do not agree about where the organization's efforts should be focused. The B case updates the A case (UVA-BP-0377) to 1995-96. See also the C case (UVA-BP-0517). 

  

Title:  Bertelsmann (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 10/2/2003
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Bertelsmann, a global media company, whose holdings include television, books, music, and printing, is considering the purchase of the publisher Random House. The backdrop for the purchase, laid out in the A case, is a publishing industry showing decreasing profitability, with the rise of celebrity-author advances and powerful retailers like Barnes & Noble and Amazon. Further complicating the decision is Bertelsmann's recent emphasis on multimedia operations, the development of which may threaten Bertelsmann's traditional print operations. The B case (UVA-BP-0419) describes Bertelsmann's purchase of Random House, and begins to make explicit the CEO's strategy for the purchase. As Bertelsmann makes a series of deals to become stronger in content delivery, difficulties with implementing new strategies under the current corporate structure are revealed. The B case leaves the reader considering where Bertelsmann should focus further investments and what structure will support a cultural shift. The C case (UVA-BP-0420) reveals Bertelsmann's decision to reorganize all e-commerce operations into one division. 

Page 8

Title: Bertelsmann (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 10/2/2003
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Bertelsmann, a global media company, whose holdings include television, books, music, and printing, is considering the purchase of the publisher Random House. The backdrop for the purchase, laid out in the A case (UVA-BP-0418), is a publishing industry showing decreasing profitability, with the rise of celebrity-author advances and powerful retailers like Barnes & Noble and Amazon. Further complicating the decision is Bertelsmann's recent emphasis on multimedia operations, the development of which may threaten Bertelsmann's traditional print operations. The B case describes Bertelsmann's purchase of Random House, and begins to make explicit the CEO's strategy for the purchase. As Bertelsmann makes a series of deals to become stronger in content delivery, difficulties with implementing new strategies under the current corporate structure are revealed. The B case leaves the reader considering where Bertelsmann should focus further investments and what structure will support a cultural shift. The C case (UVA-BP-0420) reveals Bertelsmann's decision to reorganize all e-commerce operations into one division.  

Title: Bertelsmann (C) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 8/8/2003
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Bertelsmann, a global media company, whose holdings include television, books, music, and printing, is considering the purchase of the publisher Random House. The backdrop for the purchase, laid out in the A case (UVA-BP-0418), is a publishing industry showing decreasing profitability, with the rise of celebrity-author advances and powerful retailers like Barnes & Noble and Amazon. Further complicating the decision is Bertelsmann's recent emphasis on multimedia operations, the development of which may threaten Bertelsmann's traditional print operations. The B case (UVA-BP-0419) describes Bertelsmann's purchase of Random House, and begins to make explicit the CEO's strategy for the purchase. As Bertelsmann makes a series of deals to become stronger in content delivery, difficulties with implementing new strategies under the current corporate structure are revealed. The B case leaves the reader considering where Bertelsmann should focus further investments and what structure will support a cultural shift. The C case reveals Bertelsmann's decision to reorganize all e-commerce operations into one division.  

  

Title: Piaggio (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 5/14/2003
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Piaggio, manufacturer of the Vespa motor scooter, faces the decision of whether to outsource production of a new engine. The decision in the A case is couched in uncertainty over the achievable sales volume for the engine, particularly as new and less expensive competitor products are gaining popularity. The case provides an overview of the competitive style of each of the major manufacturers and allows a discussion of core capabilities of these competitors. The B case describes what happens in the market and to Piaggio after the company has built the engine. 

  

Title: Strategic Planning at the New York Botanical Garden (A), (B) and (C) (TN) 

Type:Teaching Note
Authors: Liedtka, Jeanne
Date: 5/14/2003
Subject Area: Business Policy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case series (see also the B case, BP-0384) traces the formulation and implementation of a strategic plan for the New York Botanical Garden (NYBG), and profiles, in detail, the highly inclusive and original planning process used. The NYBG planning process reflects many of the themes of creativity, inclusiveness, and vision that characterize the concepts of strategic thinking, collaboration, and empowerment so prevalent in recent business discussions. The A case opens in early 1993, and describes the process used to produce the plan, which included the participation of staff at every level.

  

Title: HCL Technologies: Employee First, Customer Second 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 4/1/2003
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


HCL Technologies, a major Indian IT services company, rolled out a radical new strategy, "Employee First, Customer Second" (EFCS) in 2005. The strategic goals for EFCS were to create a unique employee organization, drive an inverted organizational structure, create transparency and accountability within the organization, and encourage a value-driven culture. The case describes the different aspects of this program, and its impact on employee engagement, customer experience, financial performance, and innovation in 2005-08.  

  

Title: Supply-Chain Management at W'Up Bottlery (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 3/21/2003
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


After spending a day in a meeting room in August 2005, pondering how to improve supply-chain performance, Rajat Mehra's team hit upon an idea that might enable dramatic reduction in the cost of stock-outs and excess inventory, through implementation of vendor-managed-inventory (VMI). This idea involved moving away from the current situation in which independent distributors placed orders for replenishment to the W'Up plant, which in turn shipped the items ordered. In the proposed system, distributors would instead report their inventory levels directly to the W'Up supply-chain management group. Managers in this group would then decide how much stock to send out to each distributor. This plan mirrored the concept of vendor-managed inventory (VMI) that was gaining popularity in the West. A novel idea for implementation allowed the company to circumvent the scarcity of IT infrastructure. See also the A case (UVA-OM-1351). 

  

Title: Supply Chain Management at W'Up Bottlery (A) and (B) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 3/11/2003
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


At the W'Up Bottlery in Uttar Pradesh, India, Rajat Mehra, director of supply-chain management, mused over the W'Up plant's supply-chain performance over the peak summer period that had just ended. The W'Up Bottlery, which was a wholly owned subsidiary of Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Private Limited (HCCBPL), made Coca-Cola and other soft drinks for several regions within the Uttar Pradesh market. While inventories had gone down and fill rates had improved relative to the previous peak-sales season, Mehra was looking for ways to improve performance dramatically. Mehra had heard about the concept of vendor-managed inventory (VMI) that was gaining popularity in the West. Implementing VMI would involve moving away from the current situation in which independent distributors placed orders for replenishment to the W'Up plant, to one in which distributors would instead report their inventory levels directly to the W'Up supply-chain management group. Managers in this group would then decide how much stock to send out to each distributor. Mehra and his team wondered how this idea might be applied to HCCBPL's highly fragmented supply chain, covering regions where IT infrastructure was sparse or non-existent. See also the B case (UVA-OM-1352).  

  

Title: Supply-Chain Management at W'Up Bottlery (A) 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 11/26/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


At the W'Up Bottlery in Uttar Pradesh, India, Rajat Mehra, director of supply-chain management, mused over the W'Up plant's supply-chain performance over the peak summer period that had just ended. The W'Up Bottlery, which was a wholly owned subsidiary of Hindustan Coca-Cola Beverages Private Limited (HCCBPL), made Coca-Cola and other soft drinks for several regions within the Uttar Pradesh market. While inventories had gone down and fill rates had improved relative to the previous peak-sales season, Mehra was looking for ways to improve performance dramatically. Mehra had heard about the concept of vendor-managed inventory (VMI) that was gaining popularity in the West. Implementing VMI would involve moving away from the current situation in which independent distributors placed orders for replenishment to the W'Up plant, to one in which distributors would instead report their inventory levels directly to the W'Up supply-chain management group. Managers in this group would then decide how much stock to send out to each distributor. Mehra and his team wondered how this idea might be applied to HCCBPL's highly fragmented supply chain, covering regions where IT infrastructure was sparse or non-existent. See also the B case (UVA-OM-1352).  

  

Title: Tastee Snax Cookie Company (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 11/26/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This B case allows students who have completed the Tastee Snax Cookie Company case (UVA-OM-0803) to analyze how the duration of project described in that case can be most cost-effectively shortened. 

  

Title: Managing Variability: Process Control and Process Capability 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 8/13/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This technical note provides an introduction to quality management tools, with a focus on the concepts of process control and process capability. 

  

Title: A Note on Process Analysis 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 8/5/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This note provides an introduction to process analysis, covering key concepts such as bottlenecks, capacity, capacity utilization and throughput time. Concepts are illustrated in a context that is simple and familiar to most students: neighborhood drycleaner. The note is suitable as a technical reading on process analysis in a required MBA or undergraduate course in operations management.  

  

Title: THE OPERATIONS COURSE AT DARDEN: AN INTRODUCTION 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 7/25/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia

 This note provides an introduction to the First Year Operations course in the Darden MBA program. The course is taught over 36 class sessions spanning two quarters. The note provides an introduction to operations management, why it is important, and what will be covered in this core course. The course is designed to provide students with a fundamental understanding of operations management and a perspective that will enable them to leverage their knowledge of operations to improve their managerial performance.  

Page 9

Title: A Note on Managing Process Flows 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 7/25/2002
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This note focuses on the fundamentals of managing process flows. A process viewpoint is useful when the goal is to manage operational metrics such as capacity, cost, inventory, or responsiveness. The note examines Little's Law, the fundamental relationship among three important metrics: average inventory, average throughput time, and average throughput rate in any system that is in equilibrium.  

  

Title: OceanCove 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 9/28/2001
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Rakesh Gupta sits in his new office at Nariman Point, Mumbai contemplating the future of OceanCove, which in the last two years has grown from a single seafood restaurant to a chain of five restaurants. Aware that aggressive expansion is planned in 2002 and worried about the recent proliferation of moderately expensive restaurants serving international cuisine in India, Gunta must consider a proposal to increase the size of the existing restaurants from 120 seats to 160 seats. His immediate concern is whether accepting this proposal will necessitate changing OceanCove's operating processes. The case is accompanied by a queuing simulation of the restaurant operation, implemented in Flash. Students can observe Little's Law in action and develop intuition about the operational impact of a change in demand or a change in processing rates within the restaurant. 

  

Title: A NOTE ON THE VIDEO "CREATING NEW PRODUCTS" 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 7/18/2001
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This video walks the viewer through the student team project component of an MBA elective that focuses on the process of developing a new product or service, from idea to working prototype. For the team project, each student team identifies an unmet market, develops a working prototype of a new product to fulfill that need, and showcases the product and the process used in a design fair at the end of the class ADDITIONAL MATERIALS: Video tape #M1250 

  

Title: Carrier Corporation, Montluel, France: The Aquasnap Design Project 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 2/20/2001
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case focuses on product design as a source of competitive advantage. In the late 1990s, Carrier France faced extremely high labor and overhead costs relative to smaller Italian competitors in one segment. The only way Carrier could compete was by designing a product with low labor costs. While one design alternative would lower assembly costs and space requirements, market acceptance was unpredictable. Relative to another more conservative design alternative, a delayed launch was likely. The case contains rich qualitative and quantitative information on the costs and benefits of the two Aquasnap design concepts in consideration, and focuses on which alternative to introduce.  

  

Title: Our Daily Bread Co. 

Type: Case
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 10/10/2000
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Our Daily Bread wasa small boutique bakery, producing a variety of daily and specialty breads. The company had excess capacity and was considering several options to increase revenues by entering the wholesale bread production business. The case allows students to perform process analysis in a multi-product setting with seasonal demand and evaluate the impact on capacity--as well as the profitability of--potential wholesale orders. The case also enables analysis of the option to purchase new equipment. This case is available in a multimedia CD version that highlights the stages in bread making and provides a bird's eye view of the entire operation. (UVA-OM-1018M). 

  

Title: Tastee Snax (B) (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 10/10/2000
Subject Area:  
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This B case allows students who have completed the Tastee Snax Cookie Company case (UVA-OM-0803) to analyze how the duration of project described in that case can be most cost-effectively shortened.

  

Title: Our Daily Bread Co. (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini
Date: 10/10/2000
Subject Area:  Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Our Daily Bread wasa small boutique bakery, producing a variety of daily and specialty breads. The company had excess capacity and was considering several options to increase revenues by entering the wholesale bread production business. The case allows students to perform process analysis in a multi-product setting with seasonal demand and evaluate the impact on capacity--as well as the profitability of--potential wholesale orders. The case also enables analysis of the option to purchase new equipment. This case is available in a multimedia CD version that highlights the stages in bread making and provides a bird's eye view of the entire operation. (UVA-OM-1018M).

  

Title: Carrier Corporation, Montluel France: The Aquasnap Design Project (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Ramdas, Kamalini  
Date: 10/10/2000
Subject Area:  Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This case focuses on product design as a source of competitive advantage. In the late 1990s, Carrier France faced extremely high labor and overhead costs relative to smaller Italian competitors in one segment. The only way Carrier could compete was by designing a product with low labor costs. While one design alternative would lower assembly costs and space requirements, market acceptance was unpredictable. Relative to another more conservative design alternative, a delayed launch was likely. The case contains rich qualitative and quantitative information on the costs and benefits of the two Aquasnap design concepts in consideration, and focuses on which alternative to introduce. 

  

Title: Boards for a New Venture: Putting Together Boards and Working with Them 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 10/10/2000
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This note teaches students at all levels how to establish a board for a new venture, explaining why it is necessary, how to attract the right members, how to compensate them, how to distinguish advisors versus directors, how to deal with board conflicts. 

  

Title: The Affordable Loss Principle 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 8/17/2000
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Ideal for a study of entrepreneurship as a phenomenon, this note explores the difference between causal models and effectuation. Whereas causal models focus on maximizing returns by selecting optimal strategies, effectuation begins with a determination of how much one is willing to lose and leveraging limited means in creative ways to generate new ends as well as new means. The effectuator then uses the very process of building the venture to bring other stakeholders on board and creatively leverages slack resources available in the world. At each stage of the process he or she chooses options that create more options in the future. 

  

Title: What Makes Entrepreneurs Entrepreneurial? 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 8/17/2000
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


What are the characteristics, habits, and behaviors of the species entrepreneur? Is there such a thing as "entrepreneurial thinking"? Is there a learnable and teachable "core" to entrepreneurship? The author studied the problem-solving process of 30 entrepreneurs from a variety of industries whose companies ranged in value from $200 million to $6.5 billion. Careful analysis revealed a distinct thought process: "effectual reasoning." Using U-Haul as an example, she delineates the way in which entrepreneurs factor in affordable loss, strategic partnerships, and leveraging contingencies. Thinking entrepreneurially, as opposed to managerially or strategically, means believing in a yet-to-be-made future that can be shaped by human action, and realizing that to the extent that such action can control the future, they need not expend energies trying to predict it. It is much more useful to understand and work with the people who are engaged in the decisions and actions that bring it into existence. 

  

Title: Taking the Plunge: New Luxury Ventures 

Type: Case
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 4/8/1999
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Students at all levels explore the psychology of entrepreneurship and new product branding and marketing as a young IBM executive decides whether to become an entrepreneur. He must evaluate his business plan; seek advisors; and decide how much money it will take to get started. His product idea? On-the-go water for dogs. With market research complete and a team of advisors assembled, he must decide whether to take the plunge. 

  

Title: The Bird-in-Hand Principle: Who I Am, What I Know, and Whom I Know 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 1/21/1999
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This technical note explores a framework by which entrepreneurs can evaluate their ideas before going forward based on who they are, what they know, and whom they know. Drawing on frameworks presented in textbooks, trade books, journal articles, periodicals, and on Web sites that claim to predict the feasibility and value of new venture ideas. Figure 1 depicts a simple and useful summary of four key concepts at the heart of many of these frameworks: Is it doable? Is it worth doing? Can I do it? Do I want to do it? These questions address feasibility from a technical, market, financial, organizational, and motivational standpoint. 

  

Title: The Entrepreneurial Method: How Expert Entrepreneurs Create New Markets 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 9/11/1998
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This note reflects a new focus on "effectuation," the logic behind entrepreneurial expertise, which consists of tacit as well as learnable and teachable aspects of experience that are related to high performance in specific domains. Instead of taking either traits or circumstances as inputs and trying to explain variance in performance, the expertise lens focuses on understanding commonalties across a variety of experts in a single domain, given high levels of performance. Effectuation matters, not merely because expert entrepreneurs prefer an effectual logic over a causal one, but because of the details it offers of a comprehensive alternative frams for tackling entrepreneurial problems. Which fram entrepreneurs use influences how they formulate problems; what alternatives they perceive and generate; which constraints they accept, reject, and/or manipulate and how; and why they heed certain criteria over others in fabricating and implementing new solutions. Logical framing matters because it makes a real difference in the world and makes a world of difference in the reality entrepreneurs perceive and make possible or impossible.

  

Title: New Venture Performance 

Type: Technical Note
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 6/24/1998
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This note examines the pros and cons of two ways to build new ventures. The former is called causal or predictive, because it depends on accurate predictions and clear goals. The latter is effectual or nonpredictive, and it is extremely stakeholder-dependent and means-driven. It is very tempting to jump to the conclusion that the latter is the better way since it is overwhelmingly preferred by expert entrepreneurs. But is that really so?   

Page 10

Title: Immortal Firms in Mortal Markets? How Entrepreneurs Deal with "Innovator's Dilemma"

Type: Working Paper
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 2/11/1998
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Title: Accounting for the Future: Psychological Aspects of Effectual Entrepreneurship

Type: Working Paper
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 2/11/1998
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Title: Designing Organizations that Design Environments: Lessons from Entrepreneurial Expertise

Type: Working Paper
Authors: Sarasvathy, Saras
Date: 2/11/1998
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia

Title: Wal-Mart In The 21st Century: A Global Perspective 

Type: Case
Authors: Teisberg, Elizabeth
Date: 3/4/1997
Subject Area: Quantitative Analysis
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Although more consumers are answering questions about where they purchased merchandise in the United States with "I got it at Wal-Mart," the retail behemoth has questions it needs answered about the current, international issues it faces. Where, when, and how can it use its capabilities in other countries? And how can capabilities and knowledge developed in one part of the globe be used in North America, South America, Asia, and Europe to repeat its success? The case provides a strategic analysis of the problems of international expansion as Wal-Mart dreams of hearing the I-got-it-at-Wal-Mart answer spoken in many languages. 

  

Title: Managing Innovation at GE Medical Systems (B) 

Type: Case
Authors: Teisberg, Elizabeth
Date: 3/4/1997
Subject Area: Operations Management
Format: Cases and Multimedia


This is a revised and shortened case that revisits similar questions addressed in the A case after the situation has evolved for two more years. 

  

Title: Star India and the Indian Television Industry 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 2/21/1997
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Star India, a subsidiary of Murdoch's New Corporation, and the leading TV network in India, is considering whether to acquire (or continue its arms-length relationship) with one of its major content providers, Balaji Telefilms. The case provides information on the industry context, regulatory environment, key competitors, and the Indian TV market. The case is a good vehicle to discuss value chain concepts and understand the relative strategic positions of different players within a value chain. The case also provides a good introduction to one of the largest television markets in the world. 


Title: XYZ Corporation and Corporate Entrepreneurship 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 2/8/1995
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


After more than 40 years of focus on a single related technology platform, XYZ Corp. had begun trying to foster an entrepreneurial climate within the organization. Its goal? To develop vibrant new ventures through a program called "Growing Green Businesses." As XYZ's main product lines were becoming commoditized and several billion dollars in free cash flow became available, the timing seemed right for this new initiative. Yet efforts thus far have failed to create a robust portfolio of new businesses. How can management transform a highly successful, but large and somewhat reluctant Fortune 500 into a truly entrepreneurial firm? 

  

Title: Pedro Medina: Corporate Leader or Social Entrepreneur? 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 2/7/1995
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Successful McDonald's executive Pedro Medina recounts his transformation from business leader to social entrepreneur. After bringing the McDonald's brand to his native Colombia, Medina develops and promotes Yo Creo en Colombia (I Believe in Colombia), a grassroots initiative that empowers Colombians to take pride in their country's achievements and resources and leverage its assets into building a just and competitive nation. As the impact of his vision grows and the volume of his speaking engagements increases, Medina must choose between his lucrative corporate career and his fledgling national-empowerment venture. His new role could both fulfill his life's passion and positively affect his country. But at what personal cost? The case prompts students to examine the role of entrepreneurship in creating value and solving social problems. It forces students to buck the stereotype that entrepreneurship is all about creating a for-profit venture. It also demonstrates that the processes of entrepreneurship are the same for both for-profits and social enterprises. 

  

Title: The SimpleTel Dilemma 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 9/14/1994
Subject Area: Ethics
Format: Cases and Multimedia


Until recently, SimpleTel had been a star performer in the telecom industry, and the CEO had been a darling of the analyst community. Several years back, SimpleTel's found itself in a situation where customers were migrating to smaller, local telecom providers to avoid the congestion on SimpleTel's network. At that point, SimpleTel's leadership had decided to invest heavily in expanding network capacity. But now the company was left with a huge amount of unutilized capacity. That, along with debt obligations related to the massive investments in capacity, and lack of demand was threatening to push SimpleTel to the verge of bankruptcy. The previously celebrated CEO had fallen out of favor and shareholders were baying for his blood. He was forced to make an unceremonious departure, and the search for a savior had begun. Today, the compensation committee was due to deliberate on the compensation package for SimpleTel's new chief executive. 

  

Title: INTEL CORPORATE VENTURING 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 8/27/1993
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The case presents the challenges of trying to get a highly successful company to embrace entrepreneurship and innovation. Peter Hake has been recently appointed vice president in charge of developing the new business side of the company. Hake has a support staff of five managers reporting to him, and their collective responsibility is to promote entrepreneurship within Intel. Hake saw his central mission as creating a robust portfolio of new initiatives within the organization. After taking the job, Hake and his team have tried valiantly to encourage the young talent in Intel, both engineers and managers, to take some risks and to pursue promising new technologies and businesses. After a year of such activities, their efforts have not shown good results. The case challenges students to think about the conditions necessary for creating a vibrant entrepreneurial culture and climate within a large firm. Ideal for use in courses on: Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Corporate Venturing, Strategy. 

  

Title: PepsiCo: The Challenge of Growth Through Innovation 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 3/26/1993
Subject Area: Strategy
Format: Cases and Multimedia


How does a large corporation rethink and transform itself in an increasingly competitive environment? This corporate strategy case shows how Pepsico stopped worrying about competing with Coca-Cola, figured out what its real business was, and decided how to build its future. A new CEO wants to grow PepsiCo into a major global corporation by figuring out what it is good at, where its markets are strongest, and how to achieve growth through innovation and corporate transformation. Redefining itself as a beverage and snack business, PepsiCo sheds the restaurant business and acquires Quaker Oats and Tropicana. Then, by rethinking the synergistic relationship between the complementary, combined strengths (technological expertise in nutrition, flavor, etc., packaging, and distribution) of the merged companies, strategizes to develop innovative products that will compete in a changing demographic, cultural, and geographical world. Will this strategy work in an increasingly competitive environment? 

  

Title: Felipe Vergara and Lumni: Launching an Innovation in a Developing Economy 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date: 4/24/1991
Subject Area: Entrepreneurship and Innovation
Format: Cases and Multimedia


The case chronicles the development of Lumni, Inc., an international start-up offering innovative mechanisms for financing higher education. It focuses on: the details of decision making required to transform an idea into a viable business; building partnerships; the challenge associated with raising venture capital; and the challenges of creating a new market where human capital can be traded to finance higher education.  

  

Title: Lincoln Industries 

Type: Case
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date:  
Subject Area: Organizational Behavior and Human Resources
Format: Cases and Multimedia


What are the differences between being a good tactical leader and being a good strategic leader? As he nears retirement, Robert Lincoln muses about his successor at Lincoln Industries. The case describes the backgrounds of four potential successors, all of whom are tactically astute and very competent general managers. Lincoln realizes that the company is at a crossroads and wonders what it would take for his potential successors to graduate from being good tactical leaders to effective strategic leaders. 

  

Title:  Pepsico: The Challenge of Growth Through Innovation (TN) 

Type: Teaching Note
Authors: Venkataraman, Sankaran
Date:  
Subject Area:  
Format: Cases and Multimedia


How does a large corporation rethink and transform itself in an increasingly competitive environment? This corporate strategy case shows how Pepsico stopped worrying about competing with Coca-Cola, figured out what its real business was, and decided how to build its future. A new CEO wants to grow PepsiCo into a major global corporation by figuring out what it is good at, where its markets are strongest, and how to achieve growth through innovation and corporate transformation. Redefining itself as a beverage and snack business, PepsiCo sheds the restaurant business and acquires Quaker Oats and Tropicana. Then, by rethinking the synergistic relationship between the complementary, combined strengths (technological expertise in nutrition, flavor, etc., packaging, and distribution) of the merged companies, strategizes to develop innovative products that will compete in a changing demographic, cultural, and geographical world. Will this strategy work in an increasingly competitive environment?  

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